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10 Best Dog-Friendly Hikes in Moab, Utah (Trail Guide)


Black dog on a leash stands in a canyon while hiking in Moab, Utah.

Contrary to what many people believe, there are tons of dog-friendly hikes in Moab, Utah. Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park typically get most of the attention when it comes to Moab travel and hiking guides. However, dogs are strictly prohibited on all of the trails within both national parks (there are exceptions for trained service dogs).

But don’t fret! There are millions of acres of other public lands in the Moab area including land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Forest Service, and Utah’s Department of Natural Resources. The good news? They all allow dogs!

I live about 90 minutes away from Moab so I hike there frequently with my dog Becket. We’ve hiked many of the dog-friendly trails in the area and this list is a compilation of our favorites. The first 8 trails are what I would consider the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab. The last 2 are great hikes that are open to dogs, but may not be suitable for all pups due to the terrain.

Black furry dog stands proud on a sandy trail with red sandstone buttes and sage brush lined hills behind him in Moab, Utah.
Hiking the Sylvester Trail (#5).

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Cheatsheet: Best Dog-Friendly Hikes in Moab

Woman wearing a wide-brim black hat sits with her arm around a black dog overlooking towering sandstone cliffs with pointy tops in Moab, Utah.

Criteria For the Best Dog-Friendly Hikes in Moab

Not all dog-friendly trails are created equal! This is the criteria I used to determine which trails are worthy of being deemed one of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab.

First, a dog-friendly hike obviously has to allow dogs. As I mentioned, dogs are prohibited on every trail in both Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, but those are the only areas around Moab where pets are completely restricted.

The next most important feature of a dog-friendly hike, especially in the desert, is access to water, and/or shade. The top hikes on my list of dog-friendly hikes in Moab all provide ample water access for dogs. Hikes further down the list don’t have consistent water sources, and are better options in the fall/winter/early spring.

Next, I chose hikes that eliminate the risk of conflict with other trail users. Moab is a recreation mecca that appeals to many different types of outdoor recreationists, including mountain bikers and OHV’ers. In order to eliminate trail conflicts, most of the trails on this list are closed to mountain bikers and OHV’ers. If you don’t mind sharing the trail, there are even more dog-friendly hikes in Moab to choose from!

The last consideration for a dog-friendly hike is the terrain. There are a couple of trails that are technically open to dogs and can often be found near the top of other best dog-friendly hikes in Moab lists, but aren’t necessarily the most dog-friendly. Both require navigating around obstacles that will be difficult for most dogs. I included these at the end of the list because they’re both great hikes, they just wouldn’t be my top choice with a dog.

Woman wearing a blue puffy walks along a snowy canyon rim overlooking the Colorado River in Dead Horse Point State Park during the winter.
Dead Horse Rim Loop in the winter (#6).

Recreating Responsibly With Your Dog in Moab

Before heading out on one of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab it’s important to remember to recreate responsibly. Moab has seen a significant increase in the number of recreation visitors over the past few years, so it’s important that everyone does their part to keep the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab beautiful!

Leave No Trace

Always remember to practice the 7 Leave No Trace principles while hiking to help keep our trails clean. Here’s a refresher on the 7 principles:

  1. Plan ahead and prepare.
  2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. DON’T BUST THE CRUST! Stay on trails, slickrock, and washes and avoid walking over cryptobiotic soil.
  3. Properly dispose of waste. This includes packing out all of your trash as well as pet and human waste (this is required by law in Grand County, as discussed below)!
  4. Leave what you find.
  5. Minimize campfire impacts (you shouldn’t be having a campfire along any of these trails- save that for back at camp!).
  6. Respect wildlife.
  7. Be considerate of other visitors.

The member-driven Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics teaches people how to  enjoy the outdoors responsibly. This copyrighted information has been reprinted with permission from the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics: www.LNT.org.

Be Aware of the Heat

Moab can easily top 90-100+℉ during the summer. I would highly advise against hiking with your dog in Moab between June-August unless you go very early in the morning and choose one of the first 3 trails on this list. Personally, I’d skip visiting the desert completely and head to the mountains if you’re traveling with your dog during this time of year.

The best times to hike with your dog in Moab are during the spring, fall, and winter. I personally recommend visiting during the winter so you can avoid the crowds and have some peace of mind that your dog isn’t at risk of overheating.

A woman in a blue outfit hikes with her black dog on a leash laying in a stream in an orange canyon on one of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab, Mill Creek.
Hiking Mill Creek Trail (#2).

Keep Your Dog Under Control

Most of the trails on this list are located on BLM land where regulations require dogs to be “under control” at all times. This means either keeping your dog on a leash (the preferred method), or under strict vocal control. There are a few trails on the list that explicitly require dogs to be kept on-leash. These are noted in the trail descriptions.

If your dog doesn’t have strong recall they should be kept on-leash. Always keep a leash handy while hiking with your dog off-leash in case you encounter other dogs on-leash or small children. While large predators aren’t a concern, lizards and snakes are common during warmer months. Only you know whether your dog can hike off-leash responsibly, but you will likely see other off-leash dogs on most of these trails so I want you to be prepared!

If you’re looking for a hiking-friendly leash for your dog, I recommend checking out the Ruffwear Roamer Leash, which I reviewed HERE.

Pack out pet waste!

Pet waste is required by law to be packed out in Grand County, where Moab is located. Please do not leave poop bags on the side of the trail. This is littering and encourages others to do the same. Carry pet waste with you back to the trailhead and dispose of it properly!

Black dog on a leash walking through an orange trail in a sandstone canyon with lush green vegetation in Grandstaff Canyon, one of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab, Utah.

The Best Dog-Friendly Hikes in Moab

1. Grandstaff Trail

Grandstaff Trail has it all. A flowing creek that provides ample water for dogs, desert wildflowers during the spring, and the 6th longest natural bridge in the U.S. This is why it’s one of the best hikes in Southern Utah.

The trail is fairly heavily trafficked and easy to follow, making it a great option for beginner hikers. There are several creek crossings along the way, so your dog will have plenty of opportunities to cool off. There are typically rocks that you can use to traverse the creek crossings without getting your feet wet. The water isn’t very deep at any of the crossings (think ankle deep), even during spring runoff.

There is one section of Grandstaff Trail where you’ll need to maneuver over some boulders. It’s very easy scrambling for humans, and most dogs should be fine, but you may need to assist older dogs.

There’s very gentle elevation gain throughout the first mile or so, which picks up as you veer away from the creek into Grandstaff Canyon. After one final push up a steep section of slickrock, you’ll get a glimpse of Morning Glory Bridge. Continue hiking along the trail until you reach the bridge. 

There’s a small spring that trickles out of the canyon walls beneath Morning Glory Bridge, which creates hanging gardens. There’s plenty of room to spread out and explore beneath the bridge if there are other hikers around. Morning Glory Bridge is also a popular canyoneering route, so you may have some additional company join you from above!

Be aware there is a lot of poison ivy growing along the trail!

A red sandstone bridge in a canyon. Morning Glory Bridge in Grandstaff Canyon in Moab, Utah.

Grandstaff Canyon Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps 

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Moderate. There are a limited number of parking spaces at the trailhead, but there is overflow parking available at parking lots across the street.

Distance: 5.7 miles miles out-and-back

Elevation Gain: 830 ft.

Difficulty: 5/10. Moderate.

Estimated Hike Time: 2 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Year-round. 

AllTrails Link

Grandstaff Trail Map

2. Mill Creek

The hike up Mill Creek is best done during warm weather. In fact, it’s one of the only hikes I’d recommend doing with a dog during the heat of the summer because of the ample access to water. You and your pup are guaranteed to get wet on this one, which is why it’s one of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab.

You’ll pass a dam that creates a waterfall early on the trail. Follow the arrows on the dam and continue hiking into a desert canyon oasis. The hiking from there is easy, but if the creek is running high you’ll need to scramble over some rocks, which may be unnerving or challenging for some folks. In the event you slip and fall into the creek you could be swept over the dam during high water. Proceed with caution and keep dogs leashed on this section of trail!

Mill Creek Waterfalls

In order to get to the main waterfall in Mill Creek you’ll have to cross two water crossings. The first crossing occurs at a junction in the canyon. The junction is marked by a sign that warns hikers they will get wet.

The first water crossing is the deeper of the two. It’s easily navigable throughout most of the year, but during spring runoff it can get deep. The water was moving fairly quickly and came to the top of my thighs when I hiked in mid-May. My husband had to carry our dog across. The second water crossing is very shallow (about ankle deep).

Once you’re past the second water crossing you’ll continue up the canyon until you reach the waterfall. You’ll have to wade through some water in order to get close. There’s plenty of shallow water to splash around in, which is great on a hot day. You can continue hiking beyond this point, but the trail is largely undeveloped.

Woman in blue top, blue running vest, blue dress, and green hat stands with her arms open. Her black dog is laying in front of her in water in an orange canyon in Mill Creek in Moab, Utah.

Mill Creek Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Moderate. There are a decent number of parking spaces, but because the trail is so popular spots fill up, especially on weekends during peak season. There is some additional parking further down the road, but please be respectful of the private residences.

Distance: 1.5 miles round trip

Elevation Gain: 60 ft.

Difficulty: 2/10. Easy.

Estimated Hike Time: 1-1 ½ hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Spring, summer, and early fall.

AllTrails Link

Mill Creek Trail Map

3. Professor Creek & Mary Jane Canyon

The trail through Professor Creek & Mary Jane Canyon isn’t much of a trail at all. Rather you’ll follow a meandering creek through a scenic red canyon whose walls gradually narrow before reaching a stunning waterfall that marks an abrupt end to your hike.

This is a fairly well-known trail, but because it doesn’t have the same level of popularity as some other Moab hikes, it feels like a hidden gem. Between the access to water and the primitive views hiking through the canyon, I would consider this the most bang-for-your-buck best dog-friendly hike in Moab.

When you leave the primitive parking area you’ll immediately drop into the creek bed. The trail isn’t marked or immediately obvious, but once you cross the creek it’s easy to pick up and navigate. Just head up the canyon! You’ll spend a good portion of the hike walking through the creek, but there are a few sections of trail that bisect some of the wider bends in the canyon.

You’ll see a few small side canyons as you make your way towards the waterfall, but you’ll need a rope and technical equipment if you want to get very far. Once you reach the waterfall, turn back and hike out the way you came. Definitely save this hike for a hot day!

Woman wearing leggings and a backpack stands in water beneath a waterfall created by a large boulder in an orangey-red canyon while hiking Professor Creek and Mary Jane Canyon in Moab, Utah.

Professor Creek & Mary Jane Canyon Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps

There is no bathroom at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Difficult. Parking is very limited at the trailhead, which also serves the Sylvester Trail. Some people park along the road, however space is already very limited and this is generally not recommended. Arrive early to grab a spot!

Distance: 8.4 miles out-and-back

Elevation Gain: 540 ft.

Difficulty: 6/10. Moderate.

Estimated Hike Time: 3-4 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Spring, summer, and early fall.

AllTrails Link

Professor Creek and Mary Jane Canyon Trail Map

4. Jeep Arch

The hike to Jeep Arch just might be my favorite dog-friendly hike in Moab, especially during late fall and early spring. The trail to Jeep Arch has a lot to offer including slickrock traverses, canyon views, and the star of the hike- Jeep Arch. Note, Jeep Arch is also known as Gold Bar Arch in some circles.

There is very limited water available on the trail to Jeep Arch (only a little at the beginning of the trail), which is the biggest drawback. The trail to Jeep Arch is largely exposed, so I don’t recommend it during the summer.

While most of the hikes on this list require dogs to be “under control” at all times, dogs are asked to be kept on-leash on the trail to Jeep Arch. This requirement is in place to protect bighorn sheep breeding habitat.

The trail to Jeep Arch begins through a portal and along railroad tracks. Once you get beyond the tracks, veer right into a canyon. From there the trail is easy to follow thanks to forest green blazes on the slickrock.

The trail creates a lollipop loop, which means you’ll hike in and out on the same section of trail, before creating a loop to hike under Jeep Arch. The beginning of the loop is well-marked with a sign.

I recommend doing the loop section clockwise for the best views behind Jeep Arch. There is a short section of the trail where a tiny bit of scrambling is required, which may be difficult for small or older pups (pictured below on the left).

The highlight of the hike is climbing under Jeep Arch where you’ll get to take in views of the La Sal mountains in the distance.

Jeep Arch Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Easy-moderate. The parking lot for the Jeep Arch Trailhead is small, but there is overflow parking across the road.

Distance: 3.6 mile lollipop loop

Elevation Gain: 950 ft.

Difficulty: 5/10. Moderate.

Estimated Hike Time: 1 ½-2 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Fall, winter, and early spring.

AllTrails Link

Jeep Arch Trail Map

5. Sylvester Trail

Sylvester Trail doesn’t lead to a unique destination like an arch or waterfall, which has allowed it to evade the rise in popularity that some other Moab hikes have seen. Despite this, I still think it’s one of the most scenic hiking trails on BLM land in the Moab area. You won’t find water along the trail during most of the year, but the terrain is very dog-friendly.

Sylvester Trail begins at the same trailhead as Professor Creek & Mary Jane Canyon. Most hikers will likely be headed there, even though the sign at the trailhead shares information about the Sylvester Trail. The beginning of the trail is easy to identify and follow.

The trail alternates between following washes and hiking on a simple, single-track trail that undulates up and over hills between the washes. You gain a fair amount of elevation during the hike, but it’s gradual so it doesn’t feel overly difficult (hiking through the sand, however, is tiring).

Because you cross so many washes there are a lot of little side areas to explore if you choose (remember to stay on durable surfaces and don’t bust the crust!). Sylvester Trail is a great option if you really want to hike with your dog off-leash because there generally aren’t many people around and the washes you walk through aren’t ecologically sensitive terrain.

The trail tops out at the base of Castleton Tower and provides panoramic views of Castle Valley and Professor Valley. I highly recommend hiking at sunset for the best light, just don’t forget to carry a headlamp for the hike back!

Black dog with his tongue out stands in front of a glowing orange sandstone mesa along the Sylvester Trail in Moab, Utah.

Sylvester Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps

There are no bathrooms at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Difficult. Parking is very limited at the trailhead, which also serves Professor Creek & Mary Jane Canyon. This leads to people parking along the road, however space is already very limited and this is generally not recommended. Arrive early to grab a spot!

Distance: 7 miles out-and-back

Elevation Gain: 975 ft.

Difficulty: 6/10

Estimated Hike Time: 2 ½-3 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Fall, winter, and spring.

AllTrails Link

Sylvester Trail Map

6. Dead Horse Rim Loop

Located just outside of Canyonlands’ Island in the Sky District, Dead Horse Point State Park is home to some of the best east-facing views in Moab. This is a great location to visit for either sunrise or sunset. Unlike the national parks in the area, Dead Horse Point State Park is dog-friendly, as long as dogs remain leashed.

To get the most out of your visit plan to hike the Dead Horse Rim Loop. To complete this, combine the East Rim Trail with the West Rim Trail to create a 6-mile loop. The full loop provides scenic views of the Colorado River, Moab’s colorful potash ponds, and the La Sal mountains in the distance. There are also shorter variations of the loop that you can do.

The Dead Horse Rim Loop winds through pinyon and juniper forest over packed dirt and slickrock. Trails are well marked throughout Dead Horse Point State Park, which makes this trail a great introductory hike for hiking in the desert. You have to cross the road at a couple of points during the hike if you complete the full loop.

There are a number of viewpoints that you can tack onto the trail, which add a little extra mileage. Be sure to stay alert, there are many steep drop offs near the viewpoints!

Woman wearing a turquoise jackeet and purple backpack stands near the edge of a rock on a cliff overlooking the Colorado River along the Dead Horse Rim Loop in Dead Horse Point State Park, one of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab.

Dead Horse Rim Loop Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps 

There are bathrooms at the trailhead and along the trail.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Easy. You can begin the loop from a number of different parking lots. I recommend starting near the Visitor’s Center or the parking lot at the end of the road.

Distance: 3.5-6 mile loop

Elevation Gain: 375-500 ft.

Difficulty: 4-5/10. Moderate.

Estimated Hike Time: 1 ½-3 hours

Fee: $20/vehicle ($15 for Utah residents 65 or older) OR an annual Utah state park permit ($175 for out-of-state residents; $125 for Utah residents under 65; $65 for Utah residents over 65)

Best Seasons to Hike: Year-round.

AllTrails Link

Dead Horse Rim Loop Trail Map

7. Hidden Valley Trail

You probably won’t see Hidden Valley Trail on many “best hiking trails in Moab” lists because it doesn’t have a unique draw, but the trail is still enchanting in its own right. If you’re looking for a good workout with quiet views away from the crowds, this one is for you.

The initial stretch of Hidden Valley Trail contains steady elevation gain up a series of switchbacks. You’ll climb about 500-600 feet over a half mile, so be prepared to get your heart pumping! Once you top out and begin hiking through Hidden Valley, the trail mellows out.

From here you can make the hike as long or as short as you’d like. The Behind the Rocks Wilderness Study Area is closed to motorized use, but mountain bikes are allowed because the Hidden Valley Trail predates the WSA. If you continue hiking to the Moab Rim Trail you will likely encounter Jeeps or OHV’s.

There are petroglyph panels in Hidden Valley that document the Indigenous history of the area. Please remember to treat archaeological sites with respect, which includes not touching or damaging petroglyphs and keeping dogs leashed around sites. Even accidental damage or disturbance is punishable under federal law.

Black fluffy dog hikes on a sandy orange trail towards orange sandstone fins while hiking the Hidden Valley Trail in Moab, Utah.

Hidden Valley Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps 

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Easy-moderate. There are a fairly limited number of parking spaces at the trailhead, but the trail isn’t overly popular so spots are usually available. The trailhead is located behind a residential neighborhood, so please be respectful of the surrounding homeowners.

Distance: 6-8 miles round trip depending how far you hike behind the rocks

Elevation Gain: ~1200 ft.

Difficulty: 7/10 Difficult

Estimated Hike Time: 3-4 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Fall, winter, and spring.

AllTrails Link

Hidden Valley Trail Map

8. Moab Rim Trail

The Moab Rim Trail is the most challenging hike on this list, but it’s well worth the effort. The trail is also very popular with OHV’ers and Jeep enthusiasts. However, there is a separate section of trail known as “the Stairmaster” for hikers to use. This is the only trail on the list that permits multiple uses, but it has killer views and provides a great workout for active pups, so it makes the cut as one of the best dog-friendly trails in Moab.

The trail begins on Kane Creek Road on the south side of the Colorado River. The first mile of trail is the most strenuous, quickly gaining almost 900 ft. The majority of the climb traverses slickrock, so wearing shoes with good traction is a must. I recommend trimming your dog’s nails before your hike if they’re not accustomed to rocky terrain.

Once you reach the top of the Moab Rim, you’ll be treated to sweeping views of the city of Moab and the La Sal mountains in the distance. Continue along the trail to leave the rim and hike into the Behind the Rocks Wilderness Study Area where the trail connects to the Happy Valley Trail. You can also combine both trails for a point-to-point hike. 

Woman in a pink longsleeve top and black leggings and pink hat stands on a rock overlooking Moab, Utah and the La Sal mountains in winter.

Moab Rim Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps

There are no bathrooms at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Moderate.

Distance: 2-6 miles round trip depending how far you hike along the rim and behind the rocks

Elevation Gain: 1,900 ft.

Difficulty: 8/10. Difficult.

Estimated Hike Time: 2-4 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Fall, winter, and early spring.

AllTrails Link

Moab Rim Trail Map

Moab Hikes That Are Dog-Friendly, But May Not Be Best For Your Dog

The last two hikes on my list of the best dog-friendly hikes in Moab technically allow dogs, but have challenging obstacles. Therefore, I don’t want to steer people here first when I know there are better hikes for dogs in Moab!

Of course, I don’t know your dog’s experience or capabilities. These are both great hikes, and if this was a list of the best hikes in Moab in general they’d make the cut. If you’re confident that your dog can handle the scramble or you’re willing to turn back, then by all means hit the trail. But I personally wouldn’t recommend these hikes unless I knew your dog has experience hiking in the desert and scrambling in rough terrain.

9. Fisher Towers 

The Fisher Towers are one of the most unique and visually striking geologic formations in Moab. The towers are carved from rich, red Cutler and Moenkopi sandstone and have a rippled effect to them. The unique formations are popular amongst rock climbers and photographers alike. Be sure to look up during your hike to see if you can spot any climbers!

The trail is well-trafficked and easy to follow. You’ll immediately drop into a canyon and begin to follow the walls of the Fisher Towers, hiking over hills and across washes when necessary. The views begin from the moment you hit the trail and continue getting better as you go. The journey is the destination on this hike!

About 2 miles into the trail near the Titan (the largest of the towers) there’s a metal ladder to help hikers climb down the side of a steep drop off. Dogs will not be able to navigate down the ladder, however large and athletic dogs may be able to scramble up and through a side canyon to the left of the ladder (don’t attempt this unless you’re also comfortable with scrambling).

You can still get a solid hike in with your dog doing an out-and-back to the ladder, but I recommend continuing on to the end of the trail if you can. You’ll climb onto a ridge and get a sweeping view of the Fisher Towers looking back towards the trailhead.

Woman wearing a black sports bra and black leggings with long brown hair stands with one foot propped on a rock in front of towering red sandstone monoliths known as the Fisher Towers in Moab, Utah.

Fisher Towers Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Moderate-difficult. The trailhead for Fisher Towers is at the end of a scenic, dirt access road. The parking lot had limited spaces available and good overflow parking along the road is minimal. Rumor has it the BLM is building additional parking. There is also a small, first-come, first-serve campground with 5 sites at the trailhead, but I wouldn’t put your faith into getting a spot there.

Distance: ~4.5 miles round trip

Elevation Gain: 750 ft.

Difficulty: 6/10. Moderate.

Estimated Hike Time: 2-3 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Fall, winter, and spring.

AllTrails Link

Fisher Towers Trail Map

10. Corona Arch 

Corona Arch is easily the most popular arch hike in Moab outside of Arches National Park. And for good reason! Not only is the arch visually striking, but you can also walk underneath it and get unique views from various vantage points. There’s even a perfectly positioned boulder right under the arch that you can climb on for a fun photo.

The hike to Corona Arch is fairly short and easy, making it popular amongst families. Be aware, you are required to keep dogs on-leash in the area because the trail crosses through bighorn sheep breeding habitat.

Begin the hike to Corona Arch by crossing train tracks. Be aware, the tracks are still in use, but trains don’t come through frequently. After crossing the tracks you’ll hike parallel to the highway before making a right into a canyon.

The rest of the trail to Corona Arch is very easy to follow because it’s so heavily trafficked.

Corona Arch With Dogs Warning

The reason that I don’t think Corona Arch is great for dogs is because there’s a short and difficult scramble that has a chain for humans to use to get up. Athletic dogs can bypass the ladder by scrambling up the rock to the right of the chains, but it will likely pose a challenge for smaller and inexperienced dogs.

The first time I tried hiking to Corona Arch with my dog, Becket, we had to turn back at this point. When we returned 2 years later, he had significantly more desert hiking experience under his belt and was able to get up on his own (while remaining on-leash).

After hiking above the scramble-y bits it’s an easy hike across the slickrock towards Corona Arch. You can find a ton of places to sit and enjoy the view along the last 1/4 mile to the arch. While the trail can get crowded, it’s not hard to find a place to sit by yourself to enjoy a snack and take in the views. I recommend hiking beyond the arch and scrambling up the rock formation to the left for the best views!

Keep an eye out for the trail to Bowtie Arch on your way back to the trailhead.

Woman wearing a black longsleeve top and maroon leggings stands with one arm up with a peace sign in a front a towering sandstone arch known as Corona Arch in Moab, Utah.

Corona Arch Trail Stats

Trailhead Location: Google maps 

There is a pit toilet at the trailhead.

Trailhead Parking Difficulty: Moderate. There are a decent number of parking spaces at the trailhead along with overflow parking across the road.

Distance: 2.5 miles round trip 

Elevation Gain: 485 ft.

Difficulty: 4/10. Easy/moderate.

Estimated Hike Time: 1 ½-2 hours

Fee: None

Best Seasons to Hike: Fall, winter, and spring.

AllTrails Link

Corona Arch Trail Map


Trailhead Map of the Best Dog-Friendly Hikes in Moab


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